4 ways to recognize your employees' accomplishments
Beacon Hill Marketing Team | 03.05.20 - 10:11 AM

According to a recent survey by the Harvard Business Review, 82% of U.S. employees feel a lack of recognition from their superiors, and 40% say that they would be more energized at work if they got recognized more. 

Properly showing appreciation for your employees' accomplishments plays a fundamental role in creating a positive work environment and boosting productivity. Moreover, it leads to a higher rate of employee retention, which is crucial for any growing business.

Read on to learn about some of the most popular methods currently used by successful employers to recognize and reward their employees.

You dont always have to give an employee a raise to show them how valuable they are.You don't always have to give an employee a raise to show them how valuable they are.

1. Give shout-outs during regular team meetings

If you have an account manager who's dealing with a particularly stressful client, a web developer who's revamping the entire company website, or a salesperson who just closed a big account, make sure the other members of the team know about it. Bring it up during calls and meetings, even if it's off-topic, so that their coworkers have the chance to congratulate them. Simple gestures like this create a better sense of community, making workers feel more appreciated and motivated to keep doing well. 

"Feeling valued in a work environment is paramount for long term success," says Christopher Sauls, Business Development Manager for Beacon Hill's Life Sciences Division in Raleigh-Durham. "As a manager, I look to celebrate the 'wins' and learn from the losses. When a recruiter fills their first role, I send out an email to the team and shout out during our weekly call. Also acknowledging this milestone on social media such as Slack can broaden this recognition within our company."   

2. Amplify appreciation through social media

Don't limit the spreading of good news and adoration to in-person and over-the-phone meetings. Use your work's social media platform, whether it's Slack or Workplace, to make sure everyone in the company is aware of an employee's accomplishments. You could post about an engineer's success with completing a long and complicated project, giving other employees the chance to "like" and comment on the post. These social tools are especially important for employee recognition now, as remote work becomes more mainstream.

3. Give out awards and prizes at company-wide events

Quarterly parties are a good opportunity to hand out awards and prizes to deserving employees. Encourage your peers to bring their families to these events, so that their loved ones understand the impact and meaning of their work. Some common examples of awards are "employee of the year," "top salesperson," and "perfect attendance." As far as prizes go, customize them for each award-winner. Give them a gift card to their favorite restaurant, or tickets to a concert for a band they love. Also, remember to recognize employees for career milestones, like having worked at the company for 10 years. This will help loyal workers feel proud of the work they've done, as well as motivate younger employees to continue growing with the businesses.

4. Send personalized 'thank you' notes

Private gestures can be just as meaningful as company-wide shout-outs. Sending an email, or better yet, a physical note to an employee in response to an accomplishment is a simple way of showing your appreciation. In the note, remind them of their value by describing how their contribution is helping the business move forward and point out specific moments where their performance impressed you. This is also a good opportunity to remind employees that you and other members of the team can provide them with help and support whenever they need it.

Interested in learning about more ways to recognize your employees? Contact professional recruiters at Beacon Hill today!

This content is brought to you by the Marketing Team at Beacon Hill Staffing Group.

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